To study harbor porpoises in San Francisco Bay, researchers use scars and other unique markings to identify individual animals. They have assembled the largest photo collection of harbor porpoises in the world—and you can help by sharing your photos! Read more about our work and how you can become a citizen scientist at http://www.nwf.org/news-and-magazines/national-wildlife/animals/archives/2014/harbor-porpoises.aspx #wildlifeweek

Meet “Scoliosis” the remarkable porpoise who lives in San Francisco Bay! #wildlifeweek “It’s not often we get to look down from the Golden Gate Bridge and immediately recognize an individual porpoise. But it happened on December 21, 2013 when we re-sighted a porpoise with a unique body shape — a bit twisted, with a noticeable hump. It may be due to some spinal disorder, or possibly a major injury, though that should leave scars and there are none to be seen. Porpoises usually swim smoothly through the water, but this one leaves a small wake. Over the past 3 years, we’ve seen this particular porpoise 8 times, and what really surprised us was that she was accompanied by a calf! Because she is not “normal,” we were not sure she could withstand the rigors of pregnancy, birth, and nursing, but her calf seemed frisky and doing well at about 6 months old. So we learned a lot about harbor porpoises just from this single observation, and it confirms that they can be tough little animals.” - See more at: http://www.nwfcalifornia.org/sfporpoises/

Meet “Scoliosis” the remarkable porpoise who lives in San Francisco Bay! #wildlifeweek

“It’s not often we get to look down from the Golden Gate Bridge and immediately recognize an individual porpoise. But it happened on December 21, 2013 when we re-sighted a porpoise with a unique body shape — a bit twisted, with a noticeable hump. It may be due to some spinal disorder, or possibly a major injury, though that should leave scars and there are none to be seen. Porpoises usually swim smoothly through the water, but this one leaves a small wake. Over the past 3 years, we’ve seen this particular porpoise 8 times, and what really surprised us was that she was accompanied by a calf! Because she is not “normal,” we were not sure she could withstand the rigors of pregnancy, birth, and nursing, but her calf seemed frisky and doing well at about 6 months old. So we learned a lot about harbor porpoises just from this single observation, and it confirms that they can be tough little animals.” - See more at: http://www.nwfcalifornia.org/sfporpoises/

NWF’s California Director here: In 2010, I walked across the Golden Gate Bridge and saw what I thought were dolphins swimming below. I emailed this photo to scientist Bill Keener of Golden Gate Cetacean Research and he informed me that they were not dolphins, but the newly returned harbor porpoises. The story of their return after 65 years so inspired me that I vowed to help Bill with his work. San Francisco Bay is now the best place to study harbor porpoises in the world. Here’s the story: http://www.nwf.org/news-and-magazines/national-wildlife/animals/archives/2014/harbor-porpoises.aspx #WildlifeWeek

NWF’s California Director here: In 2010, I walked across the Golden Gate Bridge and saw what I thought were dolphins swimming below. I emailed this photo to scientist Bill Keener of Golden Gate Cetacean Research and he informed me that they were not dolphins, but the newly returned harbor porpoises. The story of their return after 65 years so inspired me that I vowed to help Bill with his work. San Francisco Bay is now the best place to study harbor porpoises in the world. Here’s the story: http://www.nwf.org/news-and-magazines/national-wildlife/animals/archives/2014/harbor-porpoises.aspx #WildlifeWeek

Congratulations to Randy & Jean Bjerke Photography, last week’s winners of Wildlife Wednesday, for their the cute squirrel photo, taken at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. Did you know we have 14 species of squirrels in California? Some even have their own Facebook page like Berkeley Squirrels! It’s Wildlife Wednesday! Post your photo of California wildlife on our wall, and our favorite will win a subscription to National Wildlife or Ranger Rick Magazine.

Congratulations to Randy & Jean Bjerke Photography, last week’s winners of Wildlife Wednesday, for their the cute squirrel photo, taken at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. Did you know we have 14 species of squirrels in California? Some even have their own Facebook page like Berkeley Squirrels!

It’s Wildlife Wednesday! Post your photo of California wildlife on our wall, and our favorite will win a subscription to National Wildlife or Ranger Rick Magazine.

Salmon, unable to swim upstream to spawn, at risk of extinction - species stranded in ocean awaiting water surge for migration The lack of rain this winter could eventually be disastrous for thirsty California, but the drought may have already ravaged some of the most storied salmon runs on the West Coast. The coho salmon of Central California, which swim up the rivers and creeks during the first winter rains, are stranded in the ocean waiting for the surge of water that signals the beginning of their annual migration, but it may never come. All the creeks between the Golden Gate and Monterey Bay are blocked by sand bars because of the lack of rain, making it impossible for the masses of salmon to reach their native streams and create the next generation of coho. Attempt to lure the cohoThe dire situation prompted the district to release 29 million gallons of valuable drinking water from Kent Lake early this month in an effort to lure the coho into the watershed, which winds 33 miles through the redwood- and oak-studded San Geronimo Valley on the northwest side of Mount Tamalpais. Steelhead trout, which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, are also waiting offshore at the same streams, but they are more resilient - unlike coho, they can often wait a year to spawn. Fishermen in jeopardyA collapse of the fall run of chinook, which is the only viable fishery left in Central California, would put hundreds of commercial fishermen and marine-related businesses out of work.